Feds invest in protecting shorelines that include WI parks

The federal government has teamed up with the city of Montreal to help secure 10 kilometres of shoreline that will include areas of Cap St. Jacques (pictured) and Bois-de-l’Île-Bizard sections of the city’s new Grand parc de l’Ouest as well as the Lachine boating club that was taken back by the city of Montreal last summer.

The federal government is investing in protecting shorelines from erosions and several West Island parks and green spaces are on the list.

The funding for the shoreline protection program comes from the government’s DMAF (Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund). With a total of two billion dollars, the 10-year program is designed to help municipalities upgrade and improve their infrastructure to deal with changes to the climate such as floods or drought.

The federal government has teamed up with the city of Montreal to help secure 10 kilometres of shoreline that will include areas of Cap St. Jacques and Bois-de-l’Île-Bizard sections of the city’s new Grand parc de l’Ouest as well as the Lachine boating club that was taken back by the city of Montreal last summer.

According to the government, the objective of the work is to “rehabilitate and secure some 10 km of shoreline using bioengineering-inspired techniques, such as planting shrubs and vegetation, which will help better manage the impacts of erosion and protect shoreline ecosystems and communities.”

“Climate change is causing severe weather to happen more frequently, and we need to help communities become more resilient to these events,” said Infrastructure and Communities Minister Catherine McKenna.”The Government of Canada is helping Montreal better manage the risk of flooding by protecting 10 kilometers of urban shoreline in the heart of the city, while also creating greater access to outdoor green spaces that the ongoing pandemic has shown to be so essential to our physical and mental health.”

“Our shoreline renaturalization efforts will not only help increase greening, but will also foster biodiversity, reduce greenhouse gases and enhance our city’s resilience, in addition to providing Montrealers with safe, high-quality access to our shorelines,” said Montreal Mayor Valérie Plante.

The work is slated to begin this year.

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