Are you ready for the June 10 solar eclipse?

For viewers in Montréal, the moon will hide only part of the sun. There, from any place where you can get a clear view of the east-northeast horizon, a partial eclipse will be visible, weather permitting, between 5:07 (sunrise) and 6:39 a.m., reaching a maximum at 5:39 (78.9%).

On Thursday, June 10, 2021, you’ll be able to see an eclipse of the sun if you’re up early enough. Right from daybreak, it will seem as though part of the sun has disappeared from the sky, eclipsed by the moon. While this event will be visible throughout Québec, the actual annular eclipse corridor will extend only across the northern part of the province.

For observers in the corridor, the entire moon will pass in front of the sun and will mask it almost entirely (89%), temporarily transforming the solar disk into what looks like a ring of fire around the moon. For viewers in Montréal, the moon will hide only part of the sun. There, from any place where you can get a clear view of the east-northeast horizon, a partial eclipse will be visible, weather permitting, between 5:07 (sunrise) and 6:39 a.m., reaching a maximum at 5:39 (78.9%).

For the occasion, curious amateur astronomers will be able to meet with members of the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan team from 5 to 6:40 a.m. on the walkway of the Parc olympique, just above the intersection of Aird and Pierre-De Coubertin streets. Places are limited; free mandatory registration on Eventbrite. 

The Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan wants to remind you that you should never look directly at the sun without using a special filter designed to protect your eyes. To encourage safe viewing of the eclipse, fact sheets with a detachable filter are distributed for free through the Montréal library network. You can also get a pair of safe viewing glasses for free from the Planétarium Rio Tinto Alcan.

You can also make an eclipse observation box yourself in advance by following the instructions provided by Espace pour la vie.

So, early on June 10, get out and skywatch safely. Just remember: You should never look directly at the sun except through a filter that meets standard ISO 12312-2:2015. Even during a partial eclipse, the sun’s rays can still cause serious damage to the retina of your eye.

— Espace pour la vie

— AB

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