In collaboration with The Woman Power collective, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) is inviting the public to reflect on question of female representation within the context of the exhibition From Africa to the Americas: Face-to-face Picasso, Past and Present. The installation The Real Demoiselles d’Avignon, located in the educational space adjacent to the exhibition, along with two discussions, respectively on July 18 and August 15, will provide a forum for expressing a female perspective on artistic depiction, inspired by Picasso’s work.

The Real Demoiselles d’Avignon by The Woman Power

A masterwork of modernity, Pablo Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907) redefined concepts of space and beauty with its staging of a fragmented and anonymous female body. The Woman Power collective promotes the positive representation and affirmation of women in society through creative projects. It used social media to invite artists in its communities to produce a photograph in dialogue with this work. From this invitation was born the participatory mosaic The Real Demoiselles d’Avignon.

Inspired by the Picasso painting, Quebec photographers Katharine Dickins, Richenda Grazette, Anick Jasmin, Feza S. Lugoma, Kamissa Ma Koïta and Chelsy Monie, along with members of The Woman Power (Joanna Chevalier, Niti Marcelle Mueth and Marie-Ange Zibi), reappropriated the narrative on the female body and presented their perspectives on the relationship between artist and model. Their photographs are featured in the exhibition From Africa to the Americas: Face-to-face Picasso, Past and Present. The Woman Power offers visitors an opportunity to continue the dialogue in the educational space by contributing to the creation of an evolving mosaic.

“The idea behind this collaborative installation is to reappropriate Picasso’s work from a 100% female perspective. Our approach is aimed at sparking a dialogue on the concept of representation in art and the role of the artist. This project is also an opportunity to showcase the talents of women on the local art scene,” explained Joanna Chevalier, founder and Artistic Director of The Woman Power.

SISTERHOOD, a discussion led by The Woman Power

  • July 18 at 6 p.m.: The Representation of women
  • August 15 at 6 p.m.: Hair and Identity

Meeting place: Lobby of the Jean-Noël Desmarais Pavilion, near the benches

To complement the installation The Real Demoiselles d’Avignon, The Woman Power is inviting Museum visitors to join in on a series of SISTERHOOD workshop-discussions inspired by a work in the exhibition. The group will lead a discussion on issues surrounding female gender representations.

  • Free activity with the purchase of admission to the exhibition From Africa to the Americas: Face-to-face Picasso, Past and Present.
  • Places are limited.
  • Presentation in French with bilingual discussion

The Woman Power is a subdivision of the cultural production company Never Was Average founded in 2017 by Joanna Chevalier and Harold Jr. Julmice. By way of participatory productions (Bodies and Tattoos, 2017‑2018), digital platforms (website and social networks) and the hosting of discussions (The Sisterhood), The Woman Power promotes a positive representation of the female gender in cultural and public spaces.

neverwasaverage.com

From Africa to the Americas: Face-to-face Picasso, Past and Present

The exhibition From Africa to the Americas: Face-to-face Picasso, Past and Present is on view at the MMFA until September 16, 2018.

—Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

—www.mbam.qc.ca

—AB

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