CSL’s Alison Levine golden at Defi Sportif boccia tournament

It was a gold medal day for Cote St. Luc’s Alison Levine (front row middle) as she represented Canada, and is now the number 3 ranked BC4 boccia player in the world following her win in the Boccia Montreal World Open.

It was a gold medal day for Cote St. Luc’s Alison Levine as she represented Canada, and is now the number 3 ranked BC4 boccia player in the world following her win in the Boccia Montreal World Open. Despite an early scare in pool play from her Brazilian opponent, Levine picked-up strength when the tournament entered the elimination round. Taking a 5-2 decision in the quarterfinal match, Levine took a tight 4-2 win in the semi-finals against the number six ranked Boris Nicolai of Germany. That sent Levine on to face Seong-yuk Jang of South Korea for the gold, but Jang got himself eliminated with a second yellow card infraction for improper equipment. Jang, who defeated St. Jerome’s Marco Dispaltro in the quarterfinals, received the first yellow card in that match for a ball violation during a random check. Then, in a bizarre repeat of events just prior to the finals, another ball check was made, where Jang received a second yellow card, resulting in an automatic disqualification from the competition. Both infractions were levied as the balls did not pass International standards testing and the judges ruled that Jang would have a better grip, giving him a competitive edge. Without putting a single ball into play, Levine, got to take home the home the gold. BC4 coach, César Nicolai believes that the future is bright for Levine. “It’s the first time Alison has won a gold medal at a Boccia World Open,” coach Nicolai said. “She’s following the logical progression. She won a Bronze in 2017 and silver in 2018. Alison is improving and it’s great to see.” As for the strange twist of events, Levine noted, “part of being an athlete is being responsible for your equipment. I was responsible for my equipment in making sure it was in order. The win is a great boost for our confidence moving into the pairs and team events.” Levine was paired with Dispaltro and Montreal’s Iulian Ciobanu and despite a 2-0 start, they didn’t make it to the medal round following a pair of losses to Columbia and South Korea.

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