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City_news
Detailed COVID-19 stats released for Montreal

Santé Publique de Montréal has released detailed statistics regarding COVID-19 cases and deaths in the various boroughs and cities on the island of Montreal.

They include, as of May 12:

• On the island of Montreal as a whole, there were 19,878 cases and 2,008 deaths, of which 3,743 cases were health care workers. One thousand six hundred and fifty deaths were in closed milieus, which includes CHSLDs, private seniors homes, rehabilitation centres and hospitals. Cases reached peaks between mid-April and early May.

• Côte St. Luc had 405 cases and 22 deaths. Thirty of the cases are health care workers, and 15 of the 22 deaths (68 percent) were in “closed milieus.” Cases in Côte St. Luc reached peaks March 22 and April 5, and fell off sharply afterwards.

(Note: the stats say cases are assigned to a district on the basis of the postal code of a residence, but The Suburban knows for a fact that some residents in Côte des Neiges-NDG, particularly Snowdon, receive mailings destined for Cote St. Luc residents based on their postal codes.)

PLEASE SEE CHART ON PAGE A10

• In Côte des Neiges-NDG, there were 1,616 total cases and 175 deaths. Two hundred and twenty-nine of the cases were health care workers, and 148 of the 175 deaths (85 percent) were in “closed milieus.” Peaks of cases were reached April 5 and 12.

• Dollard des Ormeaux had 290 total cases and 22 deaths — 59 of the cases were health care workers. Twelve of 22 deaths were in closed environments, 55 percent of the total. Peaks of cases were reached in early May.

(Note: These numbers seem to conflict with reports that 64 residents of a DDO CHSLD have died of the virus as of May 8.)

• Dorval had 147 cases and 29 deaths, with 15 of the cases being health care workers. Twenty-seven of 29 deaths were in closed milieus, 93 percent of the total. Peaks of cases were reached in early May.

• In Lachine, there were 417 cases and 59 deaths, with 68 of the cases being health care workers. Fifty of 59 deaths were in “closed milieus,” a total of 85 percent. Peaks were reached in mid-April and early May.

• In LaSalle, there were 946 cases and 129 deaths, with 154 cases being health care workers. One hundred and three of the 129 deaths were in closed milieus, 80 percent of the total. Peaks were reached in mid-April.

• In Town of Mount Royal, there were 226 cases and 59 deaths, with 17 cases being health care workers. Fifty-five of 59 deaths were in closed milieus, 93 percent of the total. The peak was reached in early May.

• In Outremont, there were 222 cases and eight deaths, with 16 cases being health care workers. Three of eight deaths were in closed milieus, 38 percent of the total. Peaks were reached in late March and early April.

• In Pierrefonds-Roxboro, there were 377 cases and 21 deaths, with 101 cases being health care workers. Seventeen of the 21 deaths were in closed milieus, 81 percent of the total. There were several peaks between early April and early May.

• In Pointe Claire, there were 145 cases and 21 deaths, with 19 cases being health care workers. Fifteen of 21 deaths were in closed milieus, 71 percent of the total. Peaks were reached in mid-April and early May.

• In St. Laurent, there have been 710 cases and 76 deaths, with 126 cases being health care workers. Sixty-five of 76 deaths were in “closed milieus,” a total of 86 percent. Peaks were reached throughout April and early May.

• In Westmount, there have been 149 cases and 17 deaths, with nine cases being health care workers. Fourteen of 17 deaths were in “closed milieus,” a total of 82 percent. The peak was reached in late April.


City_news
OCPM report criticizes Montreal 20/20/20 housing plan

Snowdon councillor Marvin Rotrand has supported the criticisms of the Plante administration development policies outlined in the recent release of a Montreal Office of Public Consultation (OCPM) report calling on Montreal to revise its bylaw that new residential developments of 50 or more units must contain 20 percent social housing, 20 percent affordable housing and 20 percent three-bedroom units.

“The report repeats many of the arguments that I made when I voted against the bylaw both in its version at city council and at the borough,” Rotrand says.

The councillor cited the report’s finding that “limiting the territory of the regulation’s application to only the city of Montreal indeed represents a risk of displacement of real estate projects elsewhere in the Montreal Metropolitan Community,” and that the bylaw, according to media reports, “seems to go against the intention of the draft by-law to retain or even attract households to Montreal.”

“The effort to destroy capitalism in one city by Projét Montréal administration has been rebuked,” the councillor told The Suburban. “The office said ‘you’re simply raising the price of property, thus probably encouraging first-time buyers to look elsewhere than Montreal,’ and clearly, you’re inviting developers to develop anywhere in the Montreal Metropolitan Community other than Montreal. This was a failure waiting to happen.”

Rotrand said that what he considers “the most onerous and ill-reflected parts of the city’s policy,” would come into force Jan. 1, 2021.

“I will be asking that our council freeze the changes we made last year, mandate our services to review what we can easily change so that we have requirements in place that are workable and which will not assure development leaves our sector for greener pastures.”

The Chamber of Commerce of Metropolitan Montreal’s president and CEO Michel Leblanc also weighed in on the OCPM’s findings, saying that while his organization supports the goal of inclusion and affordability “of the residential market, the by-law as proposed would reduce the number of housing starts and cause a shift in real estate activity outside of Montreal — the draft by-law must be modified.”